Spacer Image

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Spacer Image

  Main Nav
Firehouse
Cover of Firehouse
Firehouse
Borrow Borrow

"If you have tears, prepare to shed them."

—Frank McCourt

"In the firehouse, the men not only live and eat with each other,

they play sports together, go off to drink together, help repair one

another's houses, and, most important, share terrifying risks; their

loyalties to each other must, by the demands of the dangers they face,

be instinctive and absolute."

So writes David Halberstam, one of America's most distinguished reporters and historians, in this stunning New York Times

bestselling book about Engine 40, Ladder 35, located on the West Side

of Manhattan near Lincoln Center. On the morning of September 11, 2001,

two rigs carrying thirteen men set out from this firehouse: twelve of

them would never return.

Firehouse takes us to the epicenter of the tragedy. Through

the kind of intimate portraits that are Halberstam's trademark, we watch

the day unfold—the men called to duty while their families wait

anxiously for news of them. In addition, we come to understand the

culture of the firehouse itself: why gifted men do this; why, in so many

instances, they are eager to follow in their fathers' footsteps and

serve in so dangerous a profession; and why, more than anything else, it

is not just a job, but a calling.

This is journalism-as-history at its best, the story of what happens

when one small institution gets caught in an apocalyptic day. Firehouse is a book that will move readers as few others have in our time.

"If you have tears, prepare to shed them."

—Frank McCourt

"In the firehouse, the men not only live and eat with each other,

they play sports together, go off to drink together, help repair one

another's houses, and, most important, share terrifying risks; their

loyalties to each other must, by the demands of the dangers they face,

be instinctive and absolute."

So writes David Halberstam, one of America's most distinguished reporters and historians, in this stunning New York Times

bestselling book about Engine 40, Ladder 35, located on the West Side

of Manhattan near Lincoln Center. On the morning of September 11, 2001,

two rigs carrying thirteen men set out from this firehouse: twelve of

them would never return.

Firehouse takes us to the epicenter of the tragedy. Through

the kind of intimate portraits that are Halberstam's trademark, we watch

the day unfold—the men called to duty while their families wait

anxiously for news of them. In addition, we come to understand the

culture of the firehouse itself: why gifted men do this; why, in so many

instances, they are eager to follow in their fathers' footsteps and

serve in so dangerous a profession; and why, more than anything else, it

is not just a job, but a calling.

This is journalism-as-history at its best, the story of what happens

when one small institution gets caught in an apocalyptic day. Firehouse is a book that will move readers as few others have in our time.

Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Subjects-
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:

Recommended for you

Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    May 27, 2002
    Halberstam's gripping chronicle of a company of Manhattan firemen on September 11 is moving without ever becoming grossly sentimental—an impressive achievement, though readers have come to expect as much from the veteran historian and journalist (author, most recently, of War in a Time of Peace). Engine 40, Ladder 35, a firehouse near Lincoln Center, sent 13 men to the World Trade Center, 12 of whom died. Through interviews with surviving colleagues and family members, Halberstam pieces together the day's events and offers portraits of the men who perished—from rookie Mike D'Auria, a former chef who liked to read about Native American culture, to Captain Frank Callahan, greatly respected by the men for his dedication and exacting standards, even if he was rather distant and laconic (when someone performed badly at a fire he would call them into his office and simply give him "The Look," a long, excruciating stare: "Nothing needed to be said—the offender was supposed to know exactly how he had transgressed, and he always did"). The book also reveals much about firehouse culture—the staunch code of ethics, the good-natured teasing, the men's loyalty to each other in matters large and small (one widow recalls that when she and her husband were planning home renovations, his colleagues somehow found out and showed up—unasked—to help, finishing the job in record time). Though he doesn't go into much detail about the technical challenges facing the fire department that day, Halberstam does convey the sheer chaos at the site and, above all, the immensity of the loss for fellow firefighters.

Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Hyperion
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 1 titles every 7 day(s).

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Close

Enhanced Details

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
Firehouse
Firehouse
David Halberstam
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
Close
Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel